Got Dough? How Billionaires Rule Our Schools

By Joanne Barkan

To see an MSNBC interview with Barkan about this article, click here.

THE COST of K–12 public schooling in the United States comes to well over $500 billion per year. So, how much influence could anyone in the private sector exert by controlling just a few billion dollars of that immense sum? Decisive influence, it turns out. A few billion dollars in private foundation money, strategically invested every year for a decade, has sufficed to define the national debate on education; sustain a crusade for a set of mostly ill-conceived reforms; and determine public policy at the local, state, and national levels. In the domain of venture philanthropy—where donors decide what social transformation they want to engineer and then design and fund projects to implement their vision—investing in education yields great bang for the buck.

Hundreds of private philanthropies together spend almost $4 billion annually to support or transform K–12 education, most of it directed to schools that serve low-income children (only religious organizations receive more money). But three funders—the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Eli and Edythe Broad (rhymes with road) Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation—working in sync, command the field. Whatever nuances differentiate the motivations of the Big Three, their market-based goals for overhauling public education coincide: choice, competition, deregulation, accountability, and data-based decision-making. And they fund the same vehicles to achieve their goals: charter schools, high-stakes standardized testing for students, merit pay for teachers whose students improve their test scores, firing teachers and closing schools when scores don’t rise adequately, and longitudinal data collection on the performance of every student and teacher. Other foundations—Ford, Hewlett, Annenberg, Milken, to name just a few—often join in funding one project or another, but the education reform movement’s success so far has depended on the size and clout of the Gates-Broad-Walton triumvirate.

Read the full Article.

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One Comment on “Got Dough? How Billionaires Rule Our Schools”

  1. bzeines says:

    After watching Waiting for Superman twice, this is no surprise to me. All the talking heads that spoke of the great good that charter schools represent, had CEO next to their name instead of principal.

    To me Charter schools are the same crap in a different package. Still standardized testing. Still rote learning. Still obedient masses. They are not interested in creating critical thinkers and innovators. They want clones to build their future technology. They just don’t want to import it. They want it home grown. Not terrible. But also, not incredibly visionary either.


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