Learning by Making

American kids should be building rockets and robots, not taking standardized tests.

By Dale Dougherty

On a morning visit to a Northern California middle school, I saw not a single student. The principal showed me around campus, but I didn’t see or hear students talking, playing, or moving about. The science lab was empty, as were the library and the playground. It was not a school holiday: It was a state-mandated STAR testing day. The school was in an academic lockdown. A volunteer manned a table filled with cupcakes, a small reward for students at day’s end.

Read the entire article in Slate here.

Maker Faire

At Maker Faire’s Make Play Day tent, visitors of all ages were invited to use their imagination, harvesting parts from old electronics to experiment, repair, hack together a new machine, or even create artPhotograph by Gregory Hayes.
 “Learning by doing” was the distillation of the learning philosophy of John Dewey. He wrote: “The school must represent present life—life as real and vital to the child as that which he carries on in the home, in the neighborhood, or on the playground.” He also wrote that “education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.”
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